Gluten - Free Resources

Resources from Instructor Paula Youmell
of Hands On Health Holistic Healing, Potsdam, NY


Thank you everyone for participating in our gluten - free workshop a joint project between Hands on Health and Local Living VentureBelow you will find many resources, handouts and even some recipes to help you live and eat Gluten - Free!

To subscribe to Paula's blog and receive nourishing health and healing articles, go to her website and click on the subscription link: http://handsonhealthhh.com/  or go directly to her blog: www.wholefoodhealer.com.  She aspires to inspire a healthy northern NY eating whole foods grown locally!

The “Franken” Wheat Story:  http://www.grainstorm.com/pages/modern-wheat  Read this article, when you get a chance, especially page 2 and "Wendy's Story"  about her ulcerative colitis and wheat issue.  http://spiritualityhealth.com/articles/wheat-belly#.   Why I am telling you this: many, many packaged foods have lab created ingredients that are derived from wheat.  Even when you think you have removed all gluten, that is messing with your colon, if  you are eating packaged food.... there are wheat by-products in those factory made foods.   Keep your gut healthy!



One resource  I would like to share is around buying gluten free foods by the case,  Here is the link to do it at 15% above wholesale, Coop Group Buy Club link:  http://www.potsdamcoop.com/buyingclub   It is very easy, once you get the "hang" of looking things up.  You pay wholesale price plus 15% handling fee.  Nice for buying cases of things.

Flour to use that is most like wheat for texture, consistency, making sauces, etc:  oat.  Buy certified gluten free.

Gluten-Free packaged foods:  Make sure all ingredients are 100% whole foods.  If there is white rice flour, potato starch, tapioca starch, corn starch... you are avoiding gluten BUT you are eating highly refined ingredients that will only be trading off 1 health problem for another.  These refined ingredients are a diabetic nightmare waiting to happen, among other things.  Nourish your body with whole foods and health will be your reward.

Avoiding contaminationContamination happens when someone touches gluten free food or utensils with utensils that have been touching gluten containing foods.  Examples would be:  knife in butter after using on wheat toast, a toaster being used for  both gluten free and gluten containing bread, cooking gluten free pasta in same water as gluten pasta has been cooked in (happens in restaurants), using spoon to stir gluten free food after it has stirred gluten containing food, dips that people are dipping gluten crackers into makes it unsafe / unhealthy for gluten free people.

Little Stream Gluten Free breads:  You must order by noon on Mondays, it is baked on Wednesday and shipped, arrived Thursday on your doorstep via fed ex.  http://www.littlestream.com/glutenfree.html

Xanthan gum (/ˈzænθən/) is a polysaccharide secreted by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris,[2] used as a food additive andrheology modifier,[3] commonly used as a food thickening agent (in salad dressings, for example) and a stabilizer (in cosmetic products, for example, to prevent ingredients from separating). It is composed of pentasaccharide repeat units, comprising glucose, mannose, and glucuronic acid in the molar ratio 2.0:2.0:1.0.[4] It is produced by the fermentation of glucosesucrose, or lactose. After a fermentation period, the polysaccharide is precipitated from a growth medium with isopropyl alcohol, dried, and ground into a fine powder. Later, it is added to a liquid medium to form the gum.  
Not what I was thinking at all, sounds like a very gross product to me, not health giving and nourishing but factory / lab made!

Potato flakes for adding to breads, etc.:

http://www.bobsredmill.com/potato-flakes.html   These are whole potato flakes, not potato starch.  However, it does not say they have the peelings intact.  Also, not organic.  Commercially grown potatoes are one of the most toxic of vegetables.

Then there is this organic brand: https://www.azurestandard.com/shop/product/1126/  HOWEVER, contains mono and diglycerides that could be a wheat derived ingredient.

Here is a brand that is organic and you can order without additives!  http://www.edwardandsons.com/es_shop_potatoes.itml

Grains and beans resources for cooking gluten free whole grains in their whole "seed, berry" state (millet, quinoa, amaranth, teff, etc.)  Scroll down to whole grains and beans.

Thanks so much for coming.  If I can answer any question, if I left any stone un-turned... just drop me a line.  Be well, naturally & gluten-free!  Paula

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHHC, Certified Holistic Health Counselor & Coach

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PHOTO CREDIT: Facebook.com/ BizarroComics


  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher


Why I Should Avoid Wheat, Even Whole Wheat

 

98% of the wheat in the US is ground and refined into flour: all purpose, cake, bleached, unbleached, with added germ and/or bran..... They are all refined “white” flours.

 

There is a “white wheat” now on the market that is a very pale (white) whole grain wheat.  It was cross bred to please the American population obsessed with their 'white' bread, a way to get 'white' into healthier, and whole grain bread.  Keep in mind, this hybrid wheat has all the complications of wheat and gluten sensitivities.

 

Gluten is in:  wheat, barley (beer!), rye, spelt, kamut, and oats.  Oats are available gluten free as oats do not have gluten in them naturally.  Oats are contaminated in the handling process.  Beer is available in gluten free varieties.  CJ's and Price Chopper in Potsdam have gluten free beer varieties.

 

I have always loved this quote; it says it all about refined foods and their eventual, degenerative effects on the body:    

“The whiter the bread the sooner you are dead!”

Refined flours have had the bran and germ removed.  This removes the fiber and most of the nutrients.  Refined flours are sticky like glue; they were once used as wall paper paste!  This stickiness gums up your digestive tract contributing to constipation and bowel disease.  Eating 100% whole grains, 100% whole grain flours and 100% whole grain products avoids these health problems.

 

So why avoid wheat, refined or whole wheat?

 

Wheat has been destroyed by human manipulation.  It has been cross bred so many times it is far from what heritage wheat was centuries ago.  This cross breeding, creating hybrid strains, has changed the nutritional value of the wheat.  Commercial wheat is now extremely high in gluten as compared to wheat's heritage counterpart (old seed varieties that have not been cross bred). 

 

Gluten is the protein part of the grain.  Wheat has been cross bred to increase the gluten.  More gluten means higher rising, lighter, fluffier bread; the American ideal.  Gluten is what people have sensitivity and allergies to.  Cross breeding has made this sensitivity more dramatic because of the higher levels of gluten and the resultant imbalance of nutrients. 

 

A term used by health and whole food advocates is “frankenfood”.  Wheat has definitely been cross bred into a frankenfood!

 

Gluten, which is very high in these frankenfood strains of wheat, causes inflammatory reactions in your body.  Some people are very sensitive to it and eating wheat causes severe distress.  This is celiac disease. Others simply have low level inflammatory responses.  This is a harder situation to deal with as the distress is not severe and only creates low level symptoms.  People are not sure what is causing their bloating, swelling of limbs, headaches, joint pain, skin rashes, chronic cough, sinus and allergy symptoms... the list goes on & on.

 

Avoiding wheat completely will heal your gut and your whole body.  Wheat, and wheat based products, are in everything from soy sauces, packaged foods like soups/stews/salad dressings & sauces of all varieties, vodka, cosmetics, glues (even the glue you lick on envelopes!).  Avoiding wheat takes educating yourself, practice and….

Reading the Labels   The best way to be sure that your food does not contain wheat is to read the labels. Anything that contains monosodium glutamate (MSG), modified starches, or malt will usually contain wheat. Unless the label says otherwise, it is safer to assume that the product does, in fact, contains wheat.  Certified gluten free means wheat, rye & barley free.

Gluten Free Products

 

A word of caution:  when a health problem arises manufacturers are quick to respond with ' food products' of all kinds to help solve your problem.  Gluten free products are HIGHLY processed and full of junk ingredients.

 

This is equivalent to the “Health Food Store Syndrome” – people buying anything in a health food store because “it must be good for me”, “it's organic”,  “it IS sold in a health food store, right?”, etc.

 

Gluten free does not mean it is healthy.  There are thousands of gluten free products on the market:  cakes, cookies, breads, pizza crusts, boxed mixes; it is processed food heaven!  Learn to read labels.  Most of these products are full of fillers, yes they are gluten free, but they are also refined, nutritionally devoid foods.  If the natural, whole food nutrition is not in the food, the refined food product will rob your body cells of nutrients and contribute to degenerative diseases. You are trading off one health problem for another health problem of equal degenerative quality.

 

Things to look for are:  white rice flour, corn starch, potato starch, tapioca starch.  Basically cheap, filler ingredients that just do not seem real; keep refined ingredients out of your diet!  These fillers create a host of health problems in your body including blood sugar and insulin issues that contribute to inflammation and exacerbate health issues.

 

Brown rice bread without fillers is a good alternative and is carried at Potsdam Food Coop, Nature's Storehouse, Canton and maybe even Price Chopper.  Avoid the White Rice Flour bread and products; these are refined, white rice!

 

www.littlestream.com   has 4 or 5 varieties of gluten free bread that are whole foods.  Gluten free breads tend to be denser and heavier.  Gluten is what makes bread rise up and feel 'fluffy'.  This is why commercial white breads are so fluffy!  Gluten free does not get fluffy.  The brown rice, brown rice & raisin and quinoa loaves are mild tasting.  The buck wheat loaf is very yummy, has a strong taste as buck wheat is strong like rye.  (If you ever ate real rye bread, not the commercially baked variety with maybe a ¼ cup of rye flour per loaf, but real 100% rye bread.... it is dark, almost black and strong  tasting.  Russian Black Bread is a perfect example of great rye bread.  I am not teasing you here to try real rye bread, rye has gluten.  I am just giving explanations for better understanding!)

 

Some people find they easily tolerate whole spelt and whole kamut varieties of wheat.  These are heritage strains of wheat and have not been cross bred to death.  Because they are still heritage strains, the gluten is much lower and in proportion to the other nutrients, balanced like nature planned!  Know your sources to be certain spelt and kamut are being used, not a hybrid whole wheat.

 

If you want to avoid gluten, avoid spelt and kamut.  I often question whether these varieties are pure anymore or just another form of hybrid wheat with all the gluten problems.  You have to be certain of your source of grain flour.

 

Potsdam Food Coop has whole grain spelt and spelt raisin made in their Carriage House Bakery.  Little Stream Bakery has several varieties of spelt bread and a kamut loaf:  nutritious, delicious, and lower gluten.       NOTE:  If you have Celiac disease, spelt and kamut are NOT OK grains to eat.

 

What is cross contamination of gluten into gluten free foods?  Contamination happens when someone touches gluten free food or utensils with utensils that have been touching gluten containing foods.  Examples would be:  knife in butter after using on wheat toast, a toaster being used for  both gluten free and gluten containing bread, cooking gluten free pasta in same water as gluten pasta has been cooked in (happens in restaurants), using spoon to stir gluten free food after it has stirred gluten containing food, dips that people are dipping gluten crackers into makes it unsafe / unhealthy for gluten free people.

 

Enjoy whole grains; strive for heritage varieties avoiding hybrid wheat.  Paula


 If you would like more personalized attention following these steps and achieving your health goals, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  I can be reached at the contact information below.  Enjoy radiant health today and every day!  
Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing.

                 (315) 265-0961    pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com

  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher

Eating Gluten-Free Outside the Haven of Your Kitchen


First of all, I will confess, this is not always easy.  For those with true celiac disease, it is nearly impossible unless you live in an urban area with gluten-free restaurants. On a happy, whole food note, with conscious thought around food choices, gluten-free eating can happen away from home.  It just takes patience, conscious thought around food, and the will to feel great all the time.  Accept nothing less than vibrant health and you will create it!


Ok, so first of all it requires mindfulness around food choices; making a concerted decision to learn, grown, and pay attention to what is on a menu and how to order for whole food, gluten-free eating.


So, you walk into a restaurant… now what? 

  1. Let your server know you are eating gluten free.  They may be able to help you make easy choices.  Do not be disappointed if they are not; be ready to be your own menu detective.

  2. Do not feel like you have to order meals exactly as they appear on a menu.  Piece together, like a puzzle, your own appetizer, salad, and entrée options using bits and pieces of what is offered on the menu.  All menu options can be pulled apart and pieced back together to create your own unique meal.

  3. Watch for sauces, gravies, and salad dressing:  they are thickened foods. 

    Alert:  thickened means the inevitable use of flour and that flour will more than likely be refined wheat flour.  Avoid these options and find another puzzle piece to enjoy.

  4. Ask questions:  perhaps that alfredo sauce is thickened with cornstarch or tapioca starch. Make certain the server is 100% certain of the information they are handing out.

    It does matter when you just have a little, the “oh, it won’t hurt me just this once” attitude can get the inflammatory ball rolling again.

  5. Salad dressing:  ask for pure olive oil and lemon wedges.  Keep a jar of Mrs. Dash’s Table Blend in your purse or coat pocket if you want to add a bit of herbs to the lemon and olive oil.

  6. Skip bread, pasta, noodles, and desserts.  They will be made with wheat flour UNLESS the restaurant is conscious of providing gluten-free options.  The bread offered

  7. If a restaurant offers gluten free pasta question what the pasta is made out of.  Also, make certain the pasta is being cooked in a separate pot, clean water, not the hot pot that gluten containing pasta has been cooked in.  Yes, this happens as kitchen personnel are not always aware of how cross contamination occurs or even that cross contamination can actually occur!

  8. When going to visit friends and family let them know you eat gluten-free to heal your health.  Offer to bring something to share.  You help others learn, enjoy your yummy food, and you know you will have at least one thing you can eat.

     


Be positive, think health and healing, and make choices for your wellness; for the health of each and every one of your body cells. 

 If you would like more personalized attention following these steps and achieving your health goals, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  I can be reached at the above contact information.  Enjoy radiant health today and every day!  
Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing.

                 (315) 265-0961    pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com

  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher


Potential Sources of Gluten in Processed Foods and Beverages


Watch for these words on labels. They are a tip-off that the product contains gluten:


1.    Emulsifiers

2.    Flavorings

3.    Hydrolyzed Plant Protein

4.    Natural Flavorings

5.    Stabilizers

6.    Starch

7.    Oats


Food Products to be very wary of:

  • Baked Beans (canned, not home made from your own soaked beans)

  • Baking Powder

  • Beer

  • Breading and coating mixes

  • Brown Rice Syrup (May contain malted barley)

  • Canned meats and fish in broth

  • Caramel Color (Usually corn derived, but check)

  • Cheese products- Sauces and some shredded cheeses

  • Condiments (Carefully read condiment labels. Gluten is often used as a stabilizer or thickening ingredient in ketchup, mustards and Oriental sauces)

  • Deli Meats, breaded fish and meats, pre-packaged ground beef products and hot dogs

  • Dextrin (Usually corn derived but always check)

  • Dry-roasted nuts

  • Flavorings, food starches, seasonings, and malt are general and vague words to watch for on labels of packaged foods. These terms are often clues that the product may contain gluten. For example, "malt" vinegar and "malted" milk powder contain gluten.

  • Frozen French fries (In the coating)

  • Gravy Products (Dry products, bouillon cubes, and processed, canned products)

  • Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein (HVP) and Texturized Vegetable Protein (TVP)

  • Imitation fish, meats and cheeses

  • Instant flavored coffee/cocoa mixes

  • Licorice candy (black and red)

  • Matzo Meal

  • Modified Food Starch

  • Mono and di-glycerides

  • Pickled Products

  • Salad Dressings

  • Sauces, including soy sauce which is commonly made by fermenting wheat. (Check ALL processed sauce labels- From BBQ sauce to ice cream toppings, chili pepper products and tomato sauce products-all may contain gluten)

  • Sausage

  • Self-basting poultry products including turkey with added "solutions"

  • Snack foods including flavored potato chips and corn chips

  • Soups, stocks and broth

  • Spice and herb blends (spices and herbs in their natural form do not contain gluten)

  • Rice products with seasoning packets

Bottom Line: Read labels, contact manufacturers, ask questions and don't use products that you are not 100% certain are gluten free.

Gluten Free products:  Cookies, crackers, bread, pasta...etc.  Most of these products are garbage, absolute crap.  See info below and on the other hand out. Yes, I repeat this information because it is very important to know. Your cellular health depends on your wise choices!) They are made with as refined or worse ingredients as white flour bread and sugar, they just happen to be gluten free.  Do not be fooled thinking that “if they are good for people with celiac disease, they must be healthy: trust me, they are not!

Buying gluten free products:  Use the same label and ingredient reading detective skills, 100% whole foods.  Do not settle for less with your body, your body cells, or your health.

Good article to prep your mind for being a gluten detective with food: although I do not agree with the ice cream recommendation! Refined food is refined food. http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/theglutenfreediet/a/Pantry.htm

Gluten Free Products   A word of caution:  when a health problem arises manufacturers are quick to respond with ' food products' of all kinds to help solve your problem.  Gluten free products are HIGHLY processed and full of junk ingredients.

This is equivalent to the “Health Food Store Syndrome” – people buying anything in a health food store because “it must be good for me”, “it's organic”,  “it’s sold in a health food store”, etc.

Gluten free does not mean it is healthy.  There are thousands of gluten free products on the market:  cakes, cookies, breads, pizza crusts, boxed mixes; processed food heaven!  Learn to read labels.  Most of these products are full of fillers.  Yes the “fillers” in question are gluten free, but they are also refined, nutritionally devoid foods.  If the natural, whole food nutrition is not in the food, the refined food product will rob your body cells of nutrients and contribute to degenerative diseases. You are trading off one huge health problem for another of equal degenerative quality.

Things to look for are:  white rice flour, corn starch, potato starch, tapioca starch.  Basically cheap, filler ingredients that just do not seem real; keep refined ingredients out of your diet!  These fillers create a host of health problems in your body including blood sugar and insulin issues that contribute to inflammation and exacerbate health issues.

Brown rice bread without fillers is a good alternative and is carried at Potsdam Food Coop, Nature's Storehouse, Canton and maybe even Price Chopper.  Avoid the White Rice Flour bread and products; these are refined, white rice!

www.littlestream.com   has 4 varieties of gluten free bread that are whole foods.  Gluten free breads tend to be denser and heavier.  Gluten is what makes bread rise up and feel 'fluffy'.  This is why commercial white breads are so fluffy!  Gluten free does not get fluffy.  The brown rice, brown rice & raisin and quinoa loaves are mild tasting.  The buck wheat loaf is very yummy, has a strong taste as buck wheat is strong like rye.  (If you ever ate real rye bread, not the commercially baked variety with maybe a ¼ cup of rye flour per loaf, but real 100% rye bread.... it is dark, almost black and strong tasting.  Russian Black Bread is a perfect example of great rye bread.  I am not teasing you here to try real rye bread, rye has gluten.  I am just giving explanations for better understanding of the buckwheat amazing flavor!)

Enjoy the anti-inflammatory effects of giving gluten the butt kick out of your life!  Paula

 If you would like more personalized attention following these steps and achieving your health goals, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  I can be reached at the contact information below.  Enjoy radiant health today and every day!  
Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing.

                 (315) 265-0961    pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com

  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher

Gluten Free, Whole Grain Flours to Enhance Your Health

As science learns more about the makeup of a healthy diet, one fact has become clear: Refined grains are bad for our health—and our waistlines. Saying that a grain is “whole” means that it has three essential parts: the endosperm, the bran and the germ. Unlike the refined white flour in processed food and in most of our pantries, in which the nutritious bran and germ have been removed, whole-grain flours contain plenty of fiber, vitamins and minerals, plus healthy plant compounds such as lignans, phytoestrogens and phenolic compounds. These important nutrients can help us maintain a healthy weight and reduce the risk of numerous diseases including: type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, stroke, gallbladder disease, respiratory dysfunction, gout, osteoarthritis, and some cancers.

Avoiding grains that contain gluten adds ups the health benefits! 

How To Grind Your Own Gluten Free Flours

Oat flakes grind easily in a regular blender.  Buy certified gluten free.

Millet, quinoa, amaranth, and teff also grind well in a high quality blender.

Nuts and seeds:  All make yummy gluten free flours and are cheaper if you grind your own.  You need a very good blender for this, see vita mix information below.  If anyone has other high power, cheaper blender recommendations, please let me know.  Helping all, in the kitchen, do things easier & healthier is my passion!

Electric coffee grinder:  Teff grinds beautifully in a coffee grinder.  Millet, amaranth, quinoa, and oat flakes as well.  Grind ¼ cup at a time, yes it takes a few minutes but think of the fun you are having in the kitchen! 

Hand grinders:  These work well for whole oats, brown rice, wild rice, and buck wheat.  I have never used them to grind nuts or seeds into flours.  Teff does not work well in a hand grinder as the seed is too tiny and passes through the stainless steel grinding burrs.  Quinoa, amaranth, and millet are also challenging in a hand grinder.

Vita Mix Dry Pitcher:  This is a high powered blender that grinds any grains, nuts, seeds, etc. into flour beautifully.  The vita mix regular blender does not grind into flour, more of a paste, and you need to purchase the dry pitcher with the blender base and “wet” pitcher.  This is an expensive blender ($500-ish.  It lasts forever, has amazing customer service for repairs, and is worth every penny if you cook.  I have had mine for 14-15 years and use it to make all kinds of foods, for canning prep, sauces and soups, pudding, batters, nut butters, flours, and so much more.  


How to Store & Measure Whole-Grain Flour

Whole-grain flours contain a small amount of fat in the germ. This oil is responsible for the superior flavor and nutrition of whole grains, but it also means the flour can actually go bad, whereas refined “white” flours never will go bad.

Unmilled whole grains can be stored almost indefinitely, but once they are ground into flour, they must be kept in the refrigerator or freezer. The flour should smell fresh, nutty and mild, never sour or rancid

Use a fork to vigorously fluff up the flour in your bag or container. Then use a spoon to dip the now-aerated flour out of the container and into your dry measuring cup.  Fill until cup is completely full or even overfull, but do not pack it in. Use the edge of a knife to scrape excess flour off and level it at the top of the measuring cup.

When baking with whole grain flours use ¾ cup to each cup of all purpose, refined flours called for in recipes.

Types of Flour

All of the following flours are exceptionally nutritious. To reap the biggest dietary benefits, try to incorporate a number of them into your cooking rotation. Variety in grains gives you variety in nutrients. But remember to buy only the quantities that you have room to store in your fridge or freezer. 

 Ask me for my handouts on converting recipes, baking with whole grain flours.

Amaranth flour* has a bold flavor some describe as woody, grassy or malty. Try pairing amaranth flour with other bold ingredients such as chilies, coffee and pungent spices.

Bean flours* have varying degrees of starchiness. The flavor is the same as the bean. The most popular bean flour is garbanzo bean flour, also called gram flour (don’t confuse it with graham flour, which is made from wheat).

Buckwheat flour* is rich and earthy with a savory or “umami” quality. Most people either love it or hate it. Try it to find out which type you are.

Corn flour* is both sweet and bitter, so it pairs well with sweet and savory recipes. Corn flour comes in a range of grittiness so be sure to choose the coarseness you’ll want in your finished product. Kim Boyce, author of Good to the Grain, likes to pair slightly gritty corn flour with whole-wheat pastry flour for added softness.  Buy organic corn flours to avoid GMOs.

Millet flour* has a mild, corn like flavor. Use it in recipes where you might use cornmeal.

Nut flours* add moist fat that carries the specific nut flavor into your recipe. The most popular nut flours are almond, chestnut, coconut, hazelnut, pecan and walnut. To make your own, grind shelled nuts (with or without skins) in a food processor, but watch closely. There’s a fine line between nut flour and nut butter. Making homemade coconut flour is a bit more complicated.

Oat flour* is mild and nutty, and adds tremendous moisture to baked goods. Oats can be used to create various textures. Left whole, thick rolled oats add chewiness or crunchiness, depending how long they are cooked. Chop them in a food processor (or use “quick-cooking oats”) and you’ll have the familiar texture of your grandma’s oatmeal-raisin cookies. Pulverize them completely and you’ll have moist, fine-textured oat flour.  Oats are gluten-free only if certified gluten-free!  Oats get cross contaminated with wheat / gluten in the handling and processing of them as they are in facilities and on equipment used with wheat.  Oats, by nature, are gluten-free.

Potato flour* is mild-flavored and is usually used to add starch to baked goods. Use only 100% whole potato flour.

Quinoa flour* is even more strongly flavored than amaranth, with a touch of bitterness. Try it in recipes that will also feature savory ingredients such as soy sauce or meat.

Rice flour* can be sticky or not. The starches in short-grain rice tend to create sweeter, stickier flours than those made from long-grain rice. You can use this to your advantage, as in the spongy Japanese delicacy mochi, which is made from sweet rice flour.

The less-starchy flours from long-grain rice behave more like wheat flour, yet with the specific flavors of the type of rice.

Brown rice and wild rice flour is whole food; white rice is not.

Seed flours* such as flax seed bring the flavor and oils of the seed into your recipe. For the freshest product, grind seeds yourself in a coffee grinder or food processor.

Sorghum flour* tastes much like wheat, but a bit sweeter. It is made from the same plant that makes sorghum sweetener.

Teff flour* is strong-flavored and malty. It is usually fermented briefly before use, which adds an intense sourness. This Ethiopian flour is most commonly used to make the dark bread injera, but that doesn’t mean your experimentation has to stop there.

* items above with the asterisk are all gluten free grains

If you would like more personalized attention following these steps and achieving your health goals, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  I can be reached at the contact information below. 

Enjoy radiant health today and every day!               Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing

                 (315) 265-0961    pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com


  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher


Convert Any Recipe to Gluten Free
Making any recipe Gluten Free!

No new cook book is needed.  The principles are very simple:

  1. Use whole food ingredients, cooking from scratch, so you avoid lab made ingredients that are derived from wheat.

  2. Replace all flours in recipes with gluten free, whole grain flours.

  3. Avoid potato starch, white rice flour, tapioca starch, corn starch in recipes and gluten free flour mixes.  These are very refined and will cause serious health problems of their own.

     

    Website for reference: http://www.livingwithout.com/   Some of their recipes do include refined ingredients listed above, be a whole food sleuth and replace all ingredients with 100% whole food options.  Your vibrant health will be the payoff!

     

    Eating gluten free will create denser, heavier, but very tasty foods.

     

     

    Enjoy eating gluten free!  Paula

If you would like more personalized attention following these steps and achieving your health goals, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  I can be reached at the above contact information. 

Enjoy radiant health today and every day!               Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing

                 (315) 265-0961    pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com

  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________

                    RECIPES
______________________________________________________________________________________

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher


Gluten free Bread  

Makes 2 loaves, depending on your pan size

2 cups warm water; most times I use milk to increase the protein in the bread

2 tbsp. unrefined sugar

2 packages active dry yeast

4 cups 100% whole grain Gluten-Free flour*

1 tsp. unrefined sea salt

4 tbsp. butter, melted

2 well whipped eggs

 

-place warm water (110-115 F) in 4 quart mixing bowl, mix in the sugar and then sprinkle the yeast over the top.  Mix gently until yeast dissolves.

-stir in ½ the flour, melted butter and salt

-stir with wooden spoon and gradually add the rest of the flour, I use the wooden spoon to “knead” the dough in the bowl.  Keeps my hands from getting sticky!

-dough will be a large sticky mess, stir in small amounts of extra flour until dough pulls from sides of dish.

-cover with clean cloth and set in a warm place for 2 hours

-uncover after 2 hours and punch down the dough

-butter or oil a bread pan

-shape dough as best as possible into a loaf shape and put into the bread pan (it actually seems like I pour it in the bread pan, like a thick batter!)

-cover and let rise for 30 minutes or so

-bake at 350 F for about 45- 60 minutes, check after 45 to see if knife comes out clean and then gauge for yourself if it needs more time.

-remove bread pan from oven to rack, after 30 minutes or so remove bread from pan to rack – gently.

This bread will be a short loaf, dense and heavy. The below recipe using b.powder and b. soda creates a “quick bread” like a banana bread batter that rises much higher than this above yeasted recipe.

I keep this bread, after it completely cools, in a freezer bag in the refrigerator.  Slice it and toast.  Toasting may take 2-3 times, on high heat toasting, to brown it sufficiently.  This bread will be heavier, denser, and chewier as it is gluten free.  Gluten creates the rising that is the hallmark of fluffier breads.

Enjoy slathered with pasture raised butter, organic peanut butter, almond butter…whatever you please that is yummy, healthy, and a whole food!

* quinoa, millet, amaranth, teff, certified gluten free oats, buckwheat.  Have extra flour available to add if needed.

 

Quick Gluten-Free Bread Recipe, no rising time required: 

Use the same ingredients as above….EXCEPT

Skip the yeast and use a 2 tablespoons of baking powder and 2 tsp. of baking soda.  

Mix the dough up like a banana type quick bread. 

Let dough sit for 5 minutes and then test the consistency. 

Add more milk/water or flour depending on what it needs for proper consistency.

Pour into the baking pan and bake until it pulls from the sides of the pan, again 45-60 minutes

If you would like more personalized attention following these steps and achieving your health goals, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  I can be reached at the contact information below. 

Enjoy radiant health today and every day!               Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing

                 (315) 265-0961    pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com

  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher

 

Gluten Free Carrot Muffins   

Makes 12 muffins

¾ cup gently melted butter (pasture raised, grass fed)

½ cup sucanat, unrefined sugar

2 eggs

1-3 tsp. vanilla

¾ cup grated carrot

1 ¼ cup whole grain flour, gluten free

1 tbsp. b. powder

½ cup warm milk, organic, pasture raised

½ cup organic raisins

1 tsp. nutmeg

2 tsp. cinnamon

½ tsp. cloves

¾ tsp. ginger

 

  1. Warm milk gently and put raisins in it to plump them up.

  2. Whip eggs and add melted butter, sucanat sugar and vanilla.

  3. Put whole grain flour on top of wet ingredients and sprinkle b. powder and spices over top of flour.  Stir in well.

  4. Blend in carrots.

  5. Add raisins and milk.

  6. Let batter sit for 5-10 minutes and check consistency, if too liquidy add ¼ cup flour.

  7. Put into 12 buttered muffin tins OR use muffing papers.

  8. Bake for about 25 minutes at 350 F, until sides of muffins are pulling from edge of pan.

If you would like more personalized attention following these steps and achieving your health goals, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  I can be reached at the contact information below. 

Enjoy radiant health today and every day!               Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing

                 (315) 265-0961    pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com

  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher


Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

2/3 cups sucanat unrefined sugar

1 cup melted butter

½ tsp. salt

3 tsp. vanilla

1 tsp. apple cider vinegar

1 tsp. b. soda

1 egg

1 1/2 cups gluten free, whole grain flour, have extra in case needed

10 oz. package organic, fair trade chocolate chips

 

  1. Oven at 375 F

  2. Beat egg and blend in sugar, butter, vinegar  & vanilla.

  3. Place flour on top of wet ingredients and sprinkle b. soda over.  Blend in well.

  4. Add choc. Chips.

  5. Let batter sit for 5-10 minutes, if not stiff enough for cookies add ¼ cup flour at a time.  Too runny dough will make cookies that spread out all over cookie sheet.

  6. Drop by teaspoon onto cookie sheet and bake for 11-12 minutes.

  7. Allow to cool slightly before removing to cooling rack or plate.

If you would like personalized attention around food, health, healing, herbs, Reiki and/or living a more natural lifestyle, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  She can be reached at the contact information below.
Enjoy radiant health today and every day!
                       Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing


(315) 265-0961  pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com


________________________________________________________________________________________


Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher



Whole Food Pancakes

Gluten free your goal?

Use the same recipe, just make with gluten free flour.  It is really that simple!

 

1 egg, preferably from naturally raised chickens

1 cup whole grain flour*

1 cup milk from grass fed cows

2 tbsp. melted butter from grass fed cows (Kerry Gold is one good choice)

3 tsp. baking powder

½ tsp. unrefined sea salt

 

Add extra oat bran if desired

 

*start with 1 cup whole oat flour, minus 2 tbsp. and use 2 tbsp. buck wheat flour.  Keep adding more buckwheat and less oat flour as you get used to the hearty taste of whole grain flours until you are using ½ cup of each whole grain flour.

 

There are so many other whole grain flours to use.  When using whole wheat, try to use spelt or kamut varieties of wheat only.  Much better for your health.

 

Mixing directions:

 

Beat egg until fluffy, then beat in the rest of the ingredients, except oat bran.  Add oat bran last and blend in gently. 

 

Butter your pan (not margarine as it is very toxic food “product”) and cook the pancakes as you regularly would.

 

Optional:  Add blueberries, other berries or very small chunks of your favorite fruit.

 

Enjoy with small amounts of real maple syrup or local, raw honey. Pancakes are also good with nut butters and fruit, roll them up and enjoy.

 

 

Making Dry Mix  You can create your own wholegrain pancake mix by mixing together the dry ingredients, just double or triple all ingredients and keep in a tightly closing container.

 

Add the beaten egg, milk, and melted butter and  enjoy!


If you would like more personalized attention following these steps and achieving your health goals, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  I can be reached at the contact information below. 

Enjoy radiant health today and every day!               Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing

                 (315) 265-0961    pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com

  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher



Easy Pizza

Pizza Sauce
1 quart jar of canned tomatoes
1 can tomato paste, I like Muir Glen Organic paste.  It is an intensely tomato-y tasting paste
Italian herbs: rosemary, thyme, oregano, basil and parsley  
garlic, hopefully some good, local is still available in your pantry
onion

-saute' the onion in butter until gently but well cooked
-add canned tomatoes, I put tomatoes and paste in the blender and puree and I can tomatoes with the skins on
-pour a generous pile, say 1 tbsp. or so, of each herb into your hand, one at a time.  Over the pot, rub your palms together and 'grind' the herbs into the pot of sauce.
-slow cook the sauce for an hour or two
-peel garlic cloves to your taste, chop or press into the sauce, at this point the heat is off so garlic is gently 'cooked' by the heat of the sauce only
-use the sauce over your favorite pasta adding meat, cheese, beans, whatever you please.



Easy Pizza Crust 
1 cup warm water or organic milk, not hot
2 tbsp. melted butter, preferably from grass fed cows
1/2 tsp. unrefined sea salt
2-3 tsp. baking powder
2 1/2 to 3 cups whole grain flour*, I use a blend of gluten free flours that I grind myself.

Spelt, kamut, and rye would be fine also as long as you do not have gluten sensitivities.

-preheat oven to 350F
-warm the milk and melt the butter in the milk
-add 1/2 the flour amount, sea salt and baking powder
-mix well
-add more flour until you have a somewhat non-sticky dough

-place the dough into the center of a pizza pan that you have buttered or sprinkled with corn flour (or both)
-press dough down and shape into a flat circle 
-using a rolling pin that is very well floured (I use the cotton sleeve on mine), roll out dough to the edges like a pie crust.  Keep pressing the edges into a nice neat circle to prevent the cracked edges.
-pre-bake the crust for 15-20 minutes until it is starting to look crispy but not quite cooked
-remove and add the above sauce, toppings of choice, cheese and return to the oven for 5-10 minutes to finish cooking and melt the cheese.

Avoiding grains:

*Dough can be made with bean and/or nut flours, the texture will be different, obviously, but you will get used to it.  Be grateful you have created an alternative you can enjoy!

If you would like more personalized attention following these steps and achieving your health goals, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  I can be reached at the contact information below. 

Enjoy radiant health today and every day!               Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing

                 (315) 265-0961    pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com

  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher


French Breakfast Puffs

These yummy ‘lil muffin puffs taste like donuts but are easier, no frying required!

 

1/3 cup butter, melted (melt a little extra to coat the muffin tins)

¼- 1/3  cup unrefined, dehydrated cane juice sugar

1 egg

1 ¼ cup whole grain flour, I mix and match your flour choices*

½ cup milk

1 ½ tsp. b. powder

1-3 tsp. vanilla, I use more than less!

¼ - ½ tsp. nutmeg

¼ - ½ tsp. cinnamon

 

-preheat oven to 350F

-use extra butter to grease 8-9 muffin cups

-whip butter, egg, milk and sugar together

-mix dry ingredients well and fold into wet ingredients

-fill muffin cups to 2/3 full

-bake at 350F for approximately 25 minutes.  They will pull from sides of tin when cooked.


*Gluten-free eating?  Use certified gluten free oat flour (buy Bob’s Red Mill certified flakes at Potsdam Coop or Nature’s Storehouse and grind into flour in your blender.

Oat flour will give the closest to wheat consistency when making treats, bread, etc.

Millet, amaranth, quinoa, teff, buckwheat are all good gluten free grains to try.  Foods will be heavier, denser, and have a wonderful nutty flavor (the benefit of whole grain eating: flavor, not a white flour wall paper paste taste!)

Buckwheat flour is a very strong taste.  Use in small amounts if the taste is not what you are looking for in your treats!

If you would like more personalized attention following these steps and achieving your health goals, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  I can be reached at the contact information below. 

Enjoy radiant health today and every day!               Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing

                 (315) 265-0961    pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com

  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Paula M. Youmell, RN, MS, CHC

Certified Holistic Health, Nutrition & Fitness Counselor

Certified Herbalist, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher


Whole Grain Buttermilk Doughnuts

 

2 eggs

½ cup unrefined, dehydrated cane juice sugar

1 cup buttermilk (add 1 tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar to 1 cup milk and let curdle 5 minutes)

¼ cup butter melted

1 tbsp. b. powder

½ tsp. salt

2 tsp. cinnamon

1 ½ tsp. nutmeg

4 cup whole grain flour

Flour notes: I use oat, rye, barley, buckwheat, corn, spelt, teff. Use small amounts of hearty grains like the rye and more of the oat, spelt, fine ground corn, etc.  If eating gluten-free, see information above.

 

-in a large mixing bowl beat the eggs and sugar.  Stir in all other ingredients and mix well.

-cover dough and chill for about 1 hour

-shape dough into 2 balls and roll to ½ inch thickness.  Cut dough with doughnut cutter and put doughnuts on lightly greased cookie sheet until ready to fry

-heat lard or oil to 365F and maintain the temperature between 365-375F.   Too high burns, too low and doughnuts get fat soaked.

-carefully lift the doughnuts from the cookie sheet and put into hot oil.  Cook 4 – 5 at a time, no more.  Too many reduces oil temp too much and makes for fat soaked doughnuts.

-doughnuts will sink and rise again.

-cook about 1 minute son each side, they will be golden brown.

-you can coat with cinnamon sugar, powdered sugar, powdered sugar mixed with cocoa powder or eat my favorite way, plain!

-ENJOY!!!

If you would like more personalized attention following these steps and achieving your health goals, please contact Paula Youmell to set up a Nutrition and Health Consultation.  I can be reached at the contact information below. 

Enjoy radiant health today and every day!               Copyright © Hands On Health Holistic Healing

                 (315) 265-0961    pyoumell@gmail.com      www.wholefoodhealer.com

  • ____________________________________________________________________________________________



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